Maison Franco-japonaise: 日仏会館 Institut français de recherche sur le Japon à la Maison franco-japonaise (Umifre 19, MEAE-CNRS)

Langue:JA / FR


Agenda

juin 2022

Lunch Seminar on Japanese Economy and Society

Economic Philosophy in France and in Japan: A Twofold Tradition


en anglais sans traduction
vendredi 03 juin 2022 / 12:30–14:00
Online
Gilles CAMPAGNOLO (FRIJ-MFJ)

This conference will be held on the Zoom platform.

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The literature utilizes various formulas to designate the field where philosophy and economics interact. Among these, it is relevant to discuss some and say 'economic philosophy' is to be preferred. It is key that economic philosophers may be able to follow the process of economic science and business in the making, in Japan as in the rest of the world. The field can actually boast a long tradition in France (from the 18thcentury) and in Japan (since the 1920s) with big names like Sugimura Kozo or Soda Kiichiro at its start and Shionoya Yuichi more recently (deceased 2015). From strictly 'mainstream economics' to heterodox approaches to all fields of economics and adjacent social sciences as well, economic philosophy would pervade it all and this presentation will display its key features and make the field easy to understand despite a label that could otherwise sound intimidating and should rather be a source of comparative cultural differences.

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Profil :
A Full research Professor at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) at the FRIJ/MFJ, Gilles Campagnolo was educated at Paris Ecole Normale., the University of Harvard (as an Augustus Clifford Tower Fellow) and the University of Tokyo (1997-1999). He taught philosophy and economics at Paris Sorbonne University and Hokkaido University (as a Tokunin Kyojyu). He is nvited at research institutions in Japan (including Kyoto Nichibunken, Saitama U., Rikkyo U etc. He is a member of the Regional and Economics Business Network at Hokkaido University), in China (as he coordinated the European Union Project "Liberalism In Between Europe And China P-IRSES GA2012 317767) and S. Korea.
Gilles Campagnolo explores economic philosophy and has hosted the "Third International Conference of Economic Philosophy" (Aix-en-Provence, 2016) and coordinated the special issue "Economic Philosophy in Japan" of the Review of Economic Philosophy (20/1, available on the CAIRN portal). Besides focusing on sources of liberal thought and capitalist development in a comparatist perspective between Europe and East Asia, he is a known specialist of the schools of liberalism and published works by Shionoya Yuichi in French.


Moderator: Adrienne SALA (FRIJ-MFJ)

Organization: FRIJ-MFJ
Co-organization: CCI France Japon
Support: French Embassy in Japan

* À l'exception des séminaires fermés de recherche ou des événements exceptionnels requérant une inscription payante, l'accès aux manifestations de la MFJ est libre et gratuit. Prière de vous inscrire.

Keynote speech for the symposium "The Future of Liberalism. Japan, France and Germany in Global Context"

A Brief History of Equality


en anglais avec traduction simultanée
mardi 07 juin 2022 / 16:30–19:45
Online
Thomas PIKETTY (EHESS). Discussants: Lisa HERZOG (Univ. of Groningen), UNO Shigeki (The Univ. of Tokyo)

* In English with translation


This conference will be held on the Zoom platform.

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It’s easy to be pessimistic about inequality. We know it has increased dramatically in many parts of the world over the past two generations. No one has done more to reveal the problem than Thomas Piketty. Now, in this surprising and powerful new work, Piketty reminds us that the grand sweep of history gives us reasons to be optimistic. Over the centuries, he shows, we have been moving toward greater equality. Piketty guides us with elegance and concision through the great movements that have made the modern world for better and worse: the growth of capitalism, revolutions, imperialism, slavery, wars, and the building of the welfare state. It’s a history of violence and social struggle, punctuated by regression and disaster. But through it all, Piketty shows, human societies have moved fitfully toward a more just distribution of income and assets, a reduction of racial and gender inequalities, and greater access to health care, education, and the rights of citizenship. Our rough march forward is political and ideological, an endless fight against injustice. To keep moving, Piketty argues, we need to learn and commit to what works, to institutional, legal, social, fiscal, and educational systems that can make equality a lasting reality. At the same time, we need to resist historical amnesia and the temptations of cultural separatism and intellectual compartmentalization. At stake is the quality of life for billions of people. We know we can do better, Piketty concludes. The past shows us how. The future is up to us.

Program

16:30-16:45 Opening remarks
Philippe Setton (Ambassador of the French Republic to Japan)
Clemens von Goetze (Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Germany to Japan)

16:45-16:50  Introduction by Bernard Thomann, Director of the French Institute of Research on Japan, MFJ

16:50-17:00  Presentation of the symposium by its initiators, Gilles Campagnolo and Adrienne Sala (IFRJ-MFJ)

17:00-17:45 Keynote speech: A Brief History of Equality
Thomas Piketty (EHESS)

17:45-18:30 Round table
Thomas Piketty (EHESS), Lisa Herzog (University of Groningen), and Shigeki Uno (University of Tokyo)

18:30-19:40 General discussion

19:40-19:45 Concluding remarks by Franz Waldenberger, Director of the German Institute for Japanese Studies



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Moderators: Gilles CAMPAGNOLO (FRIJ-MFJ), Adrienne SALA (FRIJ-MFJ)
Organization: German Institute for Japanese Studies, FRIJ-MFJ, The Nippon Institute for Research Advancement



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The evolution of human societies can be seen to be supported by the rise of dominant narratives - religions or political ideologies, which in turn reflect the technological regimes of the times (Y. N. Harari in Homo Deus, T. Piketty in Capital and Ideology). Technology changes not only our means of production; it influences how we interact with our environment, how we perceive ourselves and our place in the world and what we consider as “good” or “bad”. The present revolutions in information technology and bioscience seem to contradict the basic assumptions of liberalism. Platform monopolies, fake news and surveillance capitalism equally undermine liberal institutions.

The present pandemic has also dramatically questioned the liberal foundations of public policies and governance in democratic regimes. The restrictive policy measures adopted in the fight against Covid-19 have produced “illiberal” outcomes similar to the stances taken by populist political parties. High-level constraints impact individual liberties, responsibility, social cohesion and/or social control, but also free trade, competitiveness and market regulation. How far are citizens prepared to accept trade-offs between civil liberties and public guarantees regarding health, environment, and safety? How are these constraints dealt with in so-called “liberal” or neoliberal” democratic countries?

The above issue is of central and essential concern for Japan and Europe and their relationships with neighbors and major partners. Taking into consideration growing pressure from a more competitive environment, Japan and Europe need to redefine their understanding of core values with regard to economic, social and individual rights to redirect their relationships not only at an intellectual and discursive level, e.g. science and “soft-power”, but also in practical terms such as national and international policies.

Rather than falling into the trap of cultural and civilizational determinism, this symposium aims to stress sociopolitical, philosophical and economic logics at work in the process of changes in production and exchange caused by the transformation of technological regimes and the ongoing global crisis. In doing so, we also intend to shed renewed light on the reception and the evolution of the liberal ideology in Asia and Europe, especially in Japan, France and Germany.

* À l'exception des séminaires fermés de recherche ou des événements exceptionnels requérant une inscription payante, l'accès aux manifestations de la MFJ est libre et gratuit. Prière de vous inscrire.

The Future of Liberalism
Japan, France and Germany in Global Context


en anglais sans traduction
mercredi 08 juin 2022 / 15:00–20:30
Online

This conference will be held on the Zoom platform.

CLIK HERE TO REGISTER

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.


For more information on how to join, please visit: https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/115004954946-Joining-and-participating-in-a-webinar-attendee-



20220508 FutureofLiberalism.jpg



The evolution of human societies can be seen to be supported by the rise of dominant narratives - religions or political ideologies, which in turn reflect the technological regimes of the times (Y. N. Harari in Homo Deus, T. Piketty in Capital and Ideology). Technology changes not only our means of production; it influences how we interact with our environment, how we perceive ourselves and our place in the world and what we consider as “good” or “bad”. The present revolutions in information technology and bioscience seem to contradict the basic assumptions of liberalism. Platform monopolies, fake news and surveillance capitalism equally undermine liberal institutions.

The present pandemic has also dramatically questioned the liberal foundations of public policies and governance in democratic regimes. The restrictive policy measures adopted in the fight against Covid-19 have produced “illiberal” outcomes similar to the stances taken by populist political parties. High-level constraints impact individual liberties, responsibility, social cohesion and/or social control, but also free trade, competitiveness and market regulation. How far are citizens prepared to accept trade-offs between civil liberties and public guarantees regarding health, environment, and safety? How are these constraints dealt with in so-called “liberal” or neoliberal” democratic countries?

The above issue is of central and essential concern for Japan and Europe and their relationships with neighbors and major partners. Taking into consideration growing pressure from a more competitive environment, Japan and Europe need to redefine their understanding of core values with regard to economic, social and individual rights to redirect their relationships not only at an intellectual and discursive level, e.g. science and “soft-power”, but also in practical terms such as national and international policies.

Rather than falling into the trap of cultural and civilizational determinism, this symposium aims to stress sociopolitical, philosophical and economic logics at work in the process of changes in production and exchange caused by the transformation of technological regimes and the ongoing global crisis. In doing so, we also intend to shed renewed light on the reception and the evolution of the liberal ideology in Asia and Europe, especially in Japan, France and Germany.



Program

Liberalism(s)/Neoliberalism(s): concepts, theories, debates

15:00-16:30 Liberalism and Uncertainty Facing Future Developments
Miriam Teschl (EHESS), Richard Sturn (University of Graz), Naoki Yoshihara (University of Massachusetts Amherst)


16:30-16:45 Break

16:45-18:15 Liberalism and Neo-liberalism as Basic Sustainable Values
Serge Audier (University Paris-Sorbonne), Tsutomu Hashimoto (Hokkaido University), Yufei Zhou (Teikyo University)

18:15-18:30 Break

18:30-19:45 Liberalism and Capitalism in Historical and Philosophical Perspective
Valérie Charolles (Institut Mines-Télécom Business School, EHESS/CNRS), Nikita Dhawan (TU Dresden), Shinji Nohara (The University of Tokyo)

19:45-20:30 Discussion


Speakers: Miriam Teschl (EHESS), Richard Sturn (University of Graz), Naoki Yoshihara (University of Massachusetts Amherst), Serge Audier (University Paris-Sorbonne), Tsutomu Hashimoto (Hokkaido University), Yufei Zhou (Teikyo University), Valérie Charolles (Institut Mines-Télécom Business School, EHESS/CNRS), Nikita Dhawan (TU Dresden), Shinji Nohara (The University of Tokyo)

Discussant: Bernard Sinclair-Desgagné (Skema Business School, GREDEG)

Moderators: Gilles Campagnolo (FRIJ-MFJ), Adrienne Sala (FRIJ-MFJ)

Organization: German Institute for Japanese Studies, FRIJ-MFJ, The Nippon Institute for Research Advancement

* À l'exception des séminaires fermés de recherche ou des événements exceptionnels requérant une inscription payante, l'accès aux manifestations de la MFJ est libre et gratuit. Prière de vous inscrire.

The Future of Liberalism
Japan, France and Germany in Global Context


en anglais sans traduction
jeudi 09 juin 2022 / 16:00–20:00
Online

This conference will be held on the Zoom platform.

CLIK HERE TO REGISTER

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.


For more information on how to join, please visit: https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/115004954946-Joining-and-participating-in-a-webinar-attendee-



20220508 FutureofLiberalism.jpg



The evolution of human societies can be seen to be supported by the rise of dominant narratives - religions or political ideologies, which in turn reflect the technological regimes of the times (Y. N. Harari in Homo Deus, T. Piketty in Capital and Ideology). Technology changes not only our means of production; it influences how we interact with our environment, how we perceive ourselves and our place in the world and what we consider as “good” or “bad”. The present revolutions in information technology and bioscience seem to contradict the basic assumptions of liberalism. Platform monopolies, fake news and surveillance capitalism equally undermine liberal institutions.

The present pandemic has also dramatically questioned the liberal foundations of public policies and governance in democratic regimes. The restrictive policy measures adopted in the fight against Covid-19 have produced “illiberal” outcomes similar to the stances taken by populist political parties. High-level constraints impact individual liberties, responsibility, social cohesion and/or social control, but also free trade, competitiveness and market regulation. How far are citizens prepared to accept trade-offs between civil liberties and public guarantees regarding health, environment, and safety? How are these constraints dealt with in so-called “liberal” or neoliberal” democratic countries?

The above issue is of central and essential concern for Japan and Europe and their relationships with neighbors and major partners. Taking into consideration growing pressure from a more competitive environment, Japan and Europe need to redefine their understanding of core values with regard to economic, social and individual rights to redirect their relationships not only at an intellectual and discursive level, e.g. science and “soft-power”, but also in practical terms such as national and international policies.

Rather than falling into the trap of cultural and civilizational determinism, this symposium aims to stress sociopolitical, philosophical and economic logics at work in the process of changes in production and exchange caused by the transformation of technological regimes and the ongoing global crisis. In doing so, we also intend to shed renewed light on the reception and the evolution of the liberal ideology in Asia and Europe, especially in Japan, France and Germany.



Program

16:00-17:30 Technology and Capitalism
Franz Waldenberger (German Institute for Japanese Studies), Cedric Durand (Univ. de Genève), Saori Shibata (Sheffield University)

17:30-17:45 Break

17:45-19:15  Technology, Digitalization and Ethics of Responsibility
Yuko Harayama (Tohoku University), Joanna Bryson (Hertie School), Mario Ionut Marosan (Univ. Laval)

19:15-20:00 Discussion and concluding remarks

Moderators: Sébastien Lechevalier (IFRJ-MFJ), Franz Waldenberger (German Institute for Japanese Studies)



Organization: German Institute for Japanese Studies, FRIJ-MFJ, The Nippon Institute for Research Advancement

* À l'exception des séminaires fermés de recherche ou des événements exceptionnels requérant une inscription payante, l'accès aux manifestations de la MFJ est libre et gratuit. Prière de vous inscrire.

Table ronde à l’occasion de la sortie du no 59 de la revue Ebisu. Études japonaises : « Films en miroir. Quarante ans de cinéma au Japon, 1980-2020 », dirigé par Mathieu Capel

Le cinéma japonais dans le monde. Le cinéma japonais vu de France


avec traduction
vendredi 17 juin 2022 / À venir
Athénée français
AIZAWA Toranosuke (cinéaste), Mathieu CAPEL (univ. de Tokyo), Fabien CARPENTRAS (univ. nationale de Yokohama), Dimitri IANNI (Festival Kinotayo), Raphaëlle YOKOTA (Inalco), TOMITA Katsuya (cinéaste)
Ebisu59_2022_couverture-ConvertImage.jpg Table ronde à l’occasion de la sortie du no 59 de la revue Ebisu. Études japonaises : « Films en miroir. Quarante ans de cinéma au Japon, 1980-2020 », dirigé par Mathieu CAPEL.

*Les modalités d'inscription seront publiées ultérieurement.

Organisation : Athénée français

Co-organisation : Ambassade de France au Japon/IFJ, IFRJ-MFJ

Cette table-ronde accompagne une programmation de films japonais choisis par les intervenants, organisée à l’Athénée français du 11 juin au 17 juin.

* À l'exception des séminaires fermés de recherche ou des événements exceptionnels requérant une inscription payante, l'accès aux manifestations de la MFJ est libre et gratuit. Prière de vous inscrire.

Correspondance des arts 5

Baudelaire
La poésie et les arts

[ Colloque franco-japonais ]

avec traduction simultanée
samedi 18 juin 2022 / 15 h - 20 h 45
Auditorium, en ligne

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Selon Baudelaire, le « meilleur compte rendu d’un tableau pourra être un sonnet ou une élégie » (Salon de 1846). De même, « il est impossible qu’un poète ne contienne pas un critique » (Richard Wagner et Tannhäuser à Paris, 1861). En quoi le peintre, le poète, le compositeur, ont-ils en partage le règne de l’imagination, « reine des facultés » (Salon de 1859) et source fondamentale de toute création ? De quelle façon la littérature, les beaux-arts et la musique, fondés sur des ressources formelles et techniques si différentes, s’interpénètrent-ils ?

À l’occasion du bicentenaire de la naissance de Baudelaire, ce colloque placé sous le signe de la « correspondance des arts » repensera la manière dont la poésie et la pensée réflexive se nourrissent et s’éclairent chez lui, pour mesurer non seulement son importance historique mais aussi son impact actuel.

Le programme contient une table ronde spéciale sur « Baudelaire et les femmes », à laquelle participeront deux grands écrivains japonais contemporains, et le colloque sera précédé d’un « Concert Baudelaire ».



Conférenciers : Antoine COMPAGNON (Académie française/prof. émérite au Collège de France), André GUYAUX (prof. émérite à Sorbonne Univ.), Jean-Luc STEINMETZ (professeur émérite à l’univ. de Nantes), Henri SCEPI (univ. Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3), Aurélia CERVONI (Sorbonne Univ.), Andrea SCHELLINO (univ. Rome III), IWAKIRI Shōichirō (ICU-International Christian univ.), ÉBINÉ Ryusuké (univ. Shirayuri), HATAKEYAMA Tōru (univ. Meiji gakuin), MIURA Atsushi (univ. de Tokyo), NAKAJI Yoshikazu (prof. émérite à l’univ. de Tokyo), SUZUKI Kazuhiko (univ. Meiji gakuin), SUZUKI Keiji (prof. émérite à l’univ. de Tokyo), TOMINARI Makoto (univ. féminine de la préfecture de Gunma), YOSHIDA Noriko (prof. émérite à l’univ. de Kobe), YOSHIMURA Kazuaki (prof. émérite à l’univ. Sophia), HIRANO Keiichirō (écrivain), NAKAJIMA Toshié (univ. de Toyama), MATSUURA Hisaki (écrivain)

Modérateurs : André GUYAUX, ÉBINÉ Ryusuké, YOSHIMURA Kazuaki, NAKAJI Yoshikazu, Henri SCEPI, MIURA Atsushi, HATAKEYAMA Toru, SUZUKI Keiji , Antoine COMPAGNON

Organisation : Fondation MFJ

Coopération : univ. Meiji gakuin, univ. Rikkyō

Soutien : Fondation Ishibashi
Collaboration : IFRJ-MFJ

* À l'exception des séminaires fermés de recherche ou des événements exceptionnels requérant une inscription payante, l'accès aux manifestations de la MFJ est libre et gratuit. Prière de vous inscrire.

Correspondance des arts 5

Baudelaire
La poésie et les arts

[ Colloque franco-japonais ]

avec traduction simultanée
dimanche 19 juin 2022 / 15 h - 20 h 45
Auditorium, en ligne

CLIQUER ICI POUR VOUS INSCRIRE



0618-19ボードレール表紙.jpg

Selon Baudelaire, le « meilleur compte rendu d’un tableau pourra être un sonnet ou une élégie » (Salon de 1846). De même, « il est impossible qu’un poète ne contienne pas un critique » (Richard Wagner et Tannhäuser à Paris, 1861). En quoi le peintre, le poète, le compositeur, ont-ils en partage le règne de l’imagination, « reine des facultés » (Salon de 1859) et source fondamentale de toute création ? De quelle façon la littérature, les beaux-arts et la musique, fondés sur des ressources formelles et techniques si différentes, s’interpénètrent-ils ?

À l’occasion du bicentenaire de la naissance de Baudelaire, ce colloque placé sous le signe de la « correspondance des arts » repensera la manière dont la poésie et la pensée réflexive se nourrissent et s’éclairent chez lui, pour mesurer non seulement son importance historique mais aussi son impact actuel.

Le programme contient une table ronde spéciale sur « Baudelaire et les femmes », à laquelle participeront deux grands écrivains japonais contemporains, et le colloque sera précédé d’un « Concert Baudelaire ».



Conférenciers : Antoine COMPAGNON (Académie française/prof. émérite au Collège de France), André GUYAUX (prof. émérite à Sorbonne Univ.), Jean-Luc STEINMETZ (professeur émérite à l’univ. de Nantes), Henri SCEPI (univ. Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3), Aurélia CERVONI (Sorbonne Univ.), Andrea SCHELLINO (univ. Rome III), IWAKIRI Shōichirō (ICU-International Christian univ.), ÉBINÉ Ryusuké (univ. Shirayuri), HATAKEYAMA Tōru (univ. Meiji gakuin), MIURA Atsushi (univ. de Tokyo), NAKAJI Yoshikazu (prof. émérite à l’univ. de Tokyo), SUZUKI Kazuhiko (univ. Meiji gakuin), SUZUKI Keiji (prof. émérite à l’univ. de Tokyo), TOMINARI Makoto (univ. féminine de la préfecture de Gunma), YOSHIDA Noriko (prof. émérite à l’univ. de Kobe), YOSHIMURA Kazuaki (prof. émérite à l’univ. Sophia), HIRANO Keiichirō (écrivain), NAKAJIMA Toshié (univ. de Toyama), MATSUURA Hisaki (écrivain)

Modérateurs : André GUYAUX, ÉBINÉ Ryusuké, YOSHIMURA Kazuaki, NAKAJI Yoshikazu, Henri SCEPI, MIURA Atsushi, HATAKEYAMA Toru, SUZUKI Keiji , Antoine COMPAGNON

Organisation : Fondation MFJ

Coopération : univ. Meiji gakuin, univ. Rikkyō

Soutien : Fondation Ishibashi
Collaboration : IFRJ-MFJ

* À l'exception des séminaires fermés de recherche ou des événements exceptionnels requérant une inscription payante, l'accès aux manifestations de la MFJ est libre et gratuit. Prière de vous inscrire.

La Vie derrière soi. Sur le style tardif

[ Conférence ]

avec traduction simultanée
mardi 21 juin 2022 / 18 h - 20 h
Auditorium
Antoine COMPAGNON (Académie française/prof. émérite au Collège de France)
図1.jpg

Comment finir une vie d’écrivain ? La littérature a un lien essentiel avec la mort, le deuil et la mélancolie. De Montaigne à Roland Barthes, c’est son fil rouge. Pourtant, les œuvres tardives des écrivains ont suscité moins de curiosité que le style de vieillesse des peintres et musiciens, plus affectés par les défaillances de leur corps, la main, l’œil ou l’oreille. « Il faudrait cesser de travailler dans un certain âge ; car tous les hommes vont déclinant », décrète le Bernin devant les derniers tableaux de Poussin. Cette conférence abordera la question du vieillissement de l'artiste et de l'évaluation de ses dernières œuvres.



Modérateur : NAKAJI Yoshikazu (prof. émérite à l’université de Tokyo)


Organisation : IFRJ-MFJ

* À l'exception des séminaires fermés de recherche ou des événements exceptionnels requérant une inscription payante, l'accès aux manifestations de la MFJ est libre et gratuit. Prière de vous inscrire.

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